Toxic Fracking Waste

Toxic Fracking Waste
UPDATE - July 2017

Since the Town of Washington banned fracking waste in 2015, over 20 other Connecticut municipalities have followed suit, including:
Andover, Ashford, Bloomfield, Branford, Chaplin, Coventry, Hampton, Hebron, Lebanon, Litchfield, Mansfield, Middletown, New London, New Milford, Pomfret, Portland, Washington, Willington, Windham (includes Willimantic), Windsor, Woodstock.

New towns and cities are being added all the time - and we applaud each and every one of them!


UPDATE - March 5, 2015

The Town of Washington has become the first municipality in Connecticut to approve a ban on fracking waste! Read the entire ordinance here.

UPDATE - May, 2014
S.B. 237 - AN ACT PROHIBITING THE STORAGE OR DISPOSAL OF
FRACKING WASTE IN CONNECTICUT


WEC’s efforts to support the enactment of S.B. 237 covered a wide range of activities. Initially, an informational flyer was sent to all postal patrons in Washington. The flyer explained the dangers associated with the storage or disposal of hydraulic fracturing waste and requested that recipients contact their legislators asking them to support S.B. 237. Letters to the Editor were sent to more than a dozen major newspapers in Connecticut expressing support for S.B. 237 and highlighting the risks associated with toxic fracking waste. WEC directors contacted public officials by email, over the phone or in person, including State Representative Arthur O’Neill, State Senator Robert Kane and Governor Dannel Malloy, urging them to support S.B. 237. On April 3rd, WEC co-sponsored a public forum and showing of “Fracking Hell: the Untold Story” to a sold-out crowd at the Gunn Memorial Library.

It is evident from the feedback received from our membership that they did not want any part of fracking waste in our state! WEC thanks all of you who contacted your Connecticut legislators asking them to be co-sponsors and vote in favor of S.B. 237. By working together on this important matter, we made a difference.

The good news is that S.B. 237 passed. However, along the way there were two amendments added by the Senate that materially changed the original Act. Nevertheless, we did achieve a three-year moratorium (effective through June 30, 2017), after which the Commissioner of DEEP has to submit proposed regulations to govern hydraulic fracturing waste in Connecticut. S.B. 237, as amended, became effective on July 1, 2014.

Again, our many thanks for the support you provided in achieving these results. We will continue to follow this critical issue and will keep you posted on any important future developments.